Download Class, Politics, and the Decline of Deference in England, 1968-2000 PDF

Class, Politics, and the Decline of Deference in England, 1968-2000

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780198812579
Pages : 261 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (198 users)

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Download or read book Class, Politics, and the Decline of Deference in England, 1968-2000 PDF or another Format written by Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2018 with total page 261 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In late 20th-century England, inequality was rocketing, yet some have suggested that the politics of class was declining in significance. This book addresses this claim, showing that class remained important to 'ordinary' people's narratives about social change and their own identities throughout the period 1968-2000, but in changing ways


Download Class, Politics, and the Decline of Deference in England, 1968-2000 PDF

Class, Politics, and the Decline of Deference in England, 1968-2000

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780192540720
Pages : 272 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (192 users)

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Download or read book Class, Politics, and the Decline of Deference in England, 1968-2000 PDF or another Format written by Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2018-03-01 with total page 272 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In late twentieth-century England, inequality was rocketing, yet some have suggested that the politics of class was declining in significance, while others argue that class identities lost little power. Neither interpretation is satisfactory: class remained important to 'ordinary' people's narratives about social change and their own identities throughout the period 1968-2000, but in changing ways. Using self-narratives drawn from a wide range of sources - the raw materials of sociological studies, transcripts from oral history projects, Mass Observation, and autobiography - the book examines class identities and narratives of social change between 1968 and 2000, showing that by the end of the period, class was often seen as an historical identity, related to background and heritage, and that many felt strict class boundaries had blurred quite profoundly since 1945. Class snobberies 'went underground', as many people from all backgrounds began to assert that what was important was authenticity, individuality, and ordinariness. In fact, Sutcliffe-Braithwaite argues that it is more useful to understand the cultural changes of these years through the lens of the decline of deference, which transformed people's attitudes towards class, and towards politics. The study also examines the claim that Thatcher and New Labour wrote class out of politics, arguing that this simple - and highly political - narrative misses important points. Thatcher was driven by political ideology and necessity to try to dismiss the importance of class, while the New Labour project was good at listening to voters - particularly swing voters in marginal seats - and echoing back what they were increasingly saying about the blurring of class lines and the importance of ordinariness. But this did not add up to an abandonment of a majoritarian project, as New Labour reoriented their political project to emphasize using the state to empower the individual.


Download Women, workplace protest and political identity in England, 1968–85 PDF

Women, workplace protest and political identity in England, 1968–85

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Publisher : Manchester University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781526124906
Pages : 208 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (526 users)

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Download or read book Women, workplace protest and political identity in England, 1968–85 PDF or another Format written by Jonathan Moss and published by Manchester University Press. This book was released on 2019-04-04 with total page 208 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book revisits women’s workplace protest from an historical perspective to deliver a new account of working-class women’s political identity in England between 1968 and 1985.


Download Political Deference in a Democratic Age PDF

Political Deference in a Democratic Age

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Publisher : Springer Nature
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ISBN 10 : 9783030625399
Pages : 354 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (3 users)

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Download or read book Political Deference in a Democratic Age PDF or another Format written by Catherine Marshall and published by Springer Nature. This book was released on 2021-01-13 with total page 354 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book explores the concept of deference as used by historians and political scientists. Often confused and judged to be outdated, it shows how deference remains central to understanding British politics to the present day. This study aims to make sense of how political deference has functioned in different periods and how it has played a crucial role in legitimising British politics. It shows how deference sustained what are essentially English institutions, those which dominated the Union well into the second half of the twentieth century until the post-1997 constitutional transformations under New Labour. While many dismiss political and institutional deference as having died out, this book argues that a number of recent political decisions – including the vote in favour of Brexit in June 2016 – are the result of a deferential way of thinking that has persisted through the democratic changes of the twentieth century. Combining close readings of theoretical texts with analyses of specific legal changes and historical events, the book charts the development of deference from the eighteenth century through to the present day. Rather than offering a comprehensive history of deference, it picks out key moments that show the changing nature of deference, both as a concept and as a political force.


Download England: A Class of Its Own PDF

England: A Class of Its Own

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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781472993038
Pages : 432 pages
Rating : 4.9/5 (472 users)

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Download or read book England: A Class of Its Own PDF or another Format written by Detlev Piltz and published by Bloomsbury Publishing. This book was released on 2022-04-14 with total page 432 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: For years German lawyer and author Detlev Piltz has been observing England, its life, customs and above all its classes. He argues that whenever an English person meets another, they will immediately try and place the individual they are talking to in a class by their speech, deportment, clothing, address and general aura. Why might this be, and does the English class system still exist in the twenty-first century? This book argues that it is very much still alive. Piltz examines the 'hard' and 'soft' class markers that permeate English society, from where Britons go on holiday to what they wear, eat, drive and what they name their pets. He explains how the way you pronounce the word 'garage' indicates your class, and asks whether it makes sense still to talk of the English Gentleman, a species of human being so often admired in continental Europe yet parodied and satirized ad infinitum. England: A Class of Its Own is based on an incredible amount of research and riddled with amusing quotations. In the same vein as Jilly Cooper's Class, this is a book that will give pleasure and amusement to many.


Download Me, Me, Me PDF

Me, Me, Me

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780191084973
Pages : 368 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (191 users)

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Download or read book Me, Me, Me PDF or another Format written by Jon Lawrence and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2019-06-27 with total page 368 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Many commentators tell us that, in today's world, everyday life has become selfish and atomised—that individuals live only to consume. But are they wrong? In Me, Me, Me, Jon Lawrence re-tells the story of England since the Second World War through the eyes of ordinary people—including his own parents— to argue that, in fact, friendship, family, and place all remain central to our daily lives, and whilst community has changed, it is far from dead. He shows how, in the years after the Second World War, people came increasingly to question custom and tradition as the pressure to conform to societal standards became intolerable. And as soon as they could, millions escaped the closed, face-to-face communities of Victorian Britain, where everyone knew your business. But this was not a rejection of community per se, but an attempt to find another, new way of living which was better suited to the modern world. Community has become personal and voluntary, based on genuine affection rather than proximity or need. We have never been better connected or able to sustain the relationships that matter to us. Me, Me, Me makes that case that it's time we valued and nurtured these new groups, rather than lamenting the loss of more 'real' forms of community—it is all too easy to hold on to a nostalgic view of the past.


Download Histories of Everyday Life PDF

Histories of Everyday Life

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780198868330
Pages : 289 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (198 users)

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Download or read book Histories of Everyday Life PDF or another Format written by Laura Carter and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2021 with total page 289 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Histories of Everyday Life is a study of the production and consumption of popular social history in mid-twentieth century Britain. It explores how non-academic historians, many of them women, developed a new breed of social history after the First World War, identified as the 'history of everyday life'. The 'history of everyday life' was a pedagogical construct based on the perceived educational needs of the new, mass democracy that emerged after 1918. It was popularized to ordinary people in educational settings, through books, in classrooms and museums, and on BBC radio. After tracing its development and dissemination between the 1920s and the 1960s, this book argues that 'history of everyday life' declined in the 1970s not because academics invented an alternative 'new' social history, but because bottom-up social change rendered this form of popular social history untenable in the changing context of mass education. Histories of Everyday Life ultimately uses the subject of history to demonstrate how profoundly the advent of mass education shaped popular culture in Britain after 1918, arguing that we should see the twentieth century as Britain's educational century.


Download The Life and Death of the Shopping City PDF

The Life and Death of the Shopping City

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781108836692
Pages : 353 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (18 users)

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Download or read book The Life and Death of the Shopping City PDF or another Format written by Alistair Kefford and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2022-04-07 with total page 353 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Traces the transformation redevelopment of Britain's cities from post-war reconstruction and modernist urban renewal to the present day.


Download Michael Young, Social Science, and the British Left, 1945-1970 PDF

Michael Young, Social Science, and the British Left, 1945-1970

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780192607805
Pages : 240 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (192 users)

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Download or read book Michael Young, Social Science, and the British Left, 1945-1970 PDF or another Format written by Lise Butler and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2020-09-02 with total page 240 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In post-war Britain, left-wing policy maker and sociologist Michael Young played a major role in shaping British intellectual, political, and cultural life, using his study of the social sciences to inform his political thought. In the mid-twentieth century the social sciences significantly expanded, and played a major role in shaping British intellectual, political and cultural life. Central to this intellectual shift was the left-wing policy maker and sociologist Michael Young. As a Labour Party policy maker in the 1940s, Young was a key architect of the Party's 1945 election manifesto, 'Let Us Face the Future'. He became a sociologist in the 1950s, publishing a classic study of the East London working class, Family and Kinship in East London with Peter Willmott in 1957, which he followed up with a dystopian satire, The Rise of the Meritocracy, about a future society in which social status was determined entirely by intelligence. Young was also a prolific social innovator, founding or inspiring dozens of organisations, including the Institute of Community Studies, the Consumers' Association, Which?magazine, the Social Science Research Council and the Open University. Moving between politics, social science, and activism, Young believed that disciplines like sociology, psychology and anthropology could help policy makers and politicians understand human nature, which in turn could help them to build better political and social institutions. This book examines the relationship between social science and public policy in left-wing politics between the end of the Second World War and the end of the first Wilson government through the figure of Michael Young. Drawing on Young's prolific writings, and his intellectual and political networks, it argues that he and other social scientists and policy makers drew on contemporary ideas from the social sciences to challenge key Labour values, like full employment and nationalisation, and to argue that the Labour Party should put more emphasis on relationships, family, and community. Showing that the social sciences were embedded in the project of social democratic governance in post-war Britain, it argues that historians and scholars should take their role in British politics and political thought seriously


Download Staging Authority PDF

Staging Authority

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Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
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ISBN 10 : 9783110574012
Pages : 510 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (11 users)

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Download or read book Staging Authority PDF or another Format written by Eva Giloi and published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. This book was released on 2022-10-24 with total page 510 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Staging Authority: Presentation and Power in Nineteenth-Century Europe is a comprehensive handbook on how the presentation, embodiment, and performance of authority changed in the long nineteenth century. It focuses on the diversification of authority: what new forms and expressions of authority arose in that critical century, how traditional authority figures responded and adapted to those changes, and how the public increasingly participated in constructing and validating authority. It pays particular attention to how spaces were transformed to offer new possibilities for the presentation of authority, and how the mediatization of presence affected traditional authority. The handbook’s fourteen chapters draw on innovative methodologies in cultural history and the aligned fields of the history of emotions, urban geography, persona studies, gender studies, media studies, and sound studies.


Download Making Cultures of Solidarity PDF

Making Cultures of Solidarity

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781000382877
Pages : 270 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 ( users)

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Download or read book Making Cultures of Solidarity PDF or another Format written by Diarmaid Kelliher and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2021-05-11 with total page 270 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book combines radical history, critical geography, and political theory in an innovative history of the solidarity campaign in London during the 1984-5 miners’ strike. Thousands of people collected food and money, joined picket lines and demonstrations, organised meetings, travelled to mining areas, and hosted coalfield activists in their homes during the strike. The support campaign encompassed longstanding elements of the British labour movement as well as autonomously organised Black, lesbian and gay, and feminist support groups. This book shows how the solidarity of 1984-5 was rooted in the development of mutual relationships of support between the coalfields and the capital since the late 1960s. It argues that a culture of solidarity was developed through industrial and political struggles that brought together diverse activists from mining communities and London. The book also takes the story forward, exploring the aftermath of the miners’ strike and the complex legacies of the support movement up to the present day. This rich history provides a compelling example of how solidarity can cross geographical and social boundaries. This book is essential reading for students, scholars, and activists with an interest in left-wing politics and history.


Download The Welfare State Generation PDF

The Welfare State Generation

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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781350192072
Pages : 264 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (35 users)

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Download or read book The Welfare State Generation PDF or another Format written by Eve Worth and published by Bloomsbury Publishing. This book was released on 2021-12-16 with total page 264 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Women born in mid twentieth-century Britain were the 'welfare state generation' – not only were their lives fundamentally shaped by the welfare state, they helped to transform it. In this ground-breaking work, Eve Worth examines the impact of the welfare state on the life course of women whose opportunities and social experiences were formed by it in the post-1945 period. Centred around an oral history study, this book argues that the welfare state was so central to the lives of women born in Britain between the late 1930s and early 1950s that they should be considered the 'welfare state generation'. The post-war expansion of the welfare state was one of the most transformative political changes of the twentieth century, yet we know little about its development in practice, nor its long-term impact on those who grew up within it. Using a ground-breaking life history methodology to examine women from their birth in the long 1940s to retirement in the mid-2010s, it includes thirty-six original life history interviews alongside social surveys and the Census for wider context By deploying a cross-class approach, this book moves the discussion on from just looking at university-educated women, to include women often overlooked in gender and social studies. Re-conceptualising the causes of social mobility in post-war Britain, exploring a new understanding of work and an updated periodisation of welfare state development, The Welfare State Generation offers a new approach to the history of class and gender, arguing that we need to move beyond the focus on women's emotions and personal identity, to consider their experiences and relationships with the state as employer, educator and provider.


Download The Neoliberal Age? PDF

The Neoliberal Age?

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Publisher : UCL Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781787356856
Pages : 396 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (787 users)

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Download or read book The Neoliberal Age? PDF or another Format written by Aled Davies and published by UCL Press. This book was released on 2021-12-07 with total page 396 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries are commonly characterised as an age of ‘neoliberalism’ in which individualism, competition, free markets and privatisation came to dominate Britain’s politics, economy and society. This historical framing has proven highly controversial, within both academia and contemporary political and public debate. Standard accounts of neoliberalism generally focus on the influence of political ideas in reshaping British politics; according to this narrative, neoliberalism was a right-wing ideology, peddled by political economists, think-tanks and politicians from the 1930s onwards, which finally triumphed in the 1970s and 1980s. The Neoliberal Age? suggests this narrative is too simplistic. Where the standard story sees neoliberalism as right-wing, this book points to some left-wing origins, too; where the standard story emphasises the agency of think-tanks and politicians, this book shows that other actors from the business world were also highly significant. Where the standard story can suggest that neoliberalism transformed subjectivities and social lives, this book illuminates other forces which helped make Britain more individualistic in the late twentieth century. The analysis thus takes neoliberalism seriously but also shows that it cannot be the only explanatory framework for understanding contemporary Britain. The book showcases cutting-edge research, making it useful to researchers and students, as well as to those interested in understanding the forces that have shaped our recent past.


Download The Bloomsbury Handbook of Popular Music and Social Class PDF

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Popular Music and Social Class

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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing USA
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ISBN 10 : 9781501345388
Pages : 616 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (51 users)

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Download or read book The Bloomsbury Handbook of Popular Music and Social Class PDF or another Format written by Ian Peddie and published by Bloomsbury Publishing USA. This book was released on 2020-02-06 with total page 616 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Bloomsbury Handbook of Popular Music and Social Class is the first extensive analysis of the most important themes and concepts in this field. Encompassing contemporary research in ethnomusicology, sociology, cultural studies, history, and race studies, the volume explores the intersections between music and class, and how the meanings of class are asserted and denied, confused and clarified, through music. With chapters on key genres, traditions, and subcultures, as well as fresh and engaging directions for future scholarship, the volume considers how music has thought about and articulated social class. It consists entirely of original contributions written by internationally renowned scholars, and provides an essential reference point for scholars interested in the relationship between popular music and social class.


Download Causes in Common PDF

Causes in Common

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Publisher : University of Wales Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781786838568
Pages : 192 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (786 users)

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Download or read book Causes in Common PDF or another Format written by Daryl Leeworthy and published by University of Wales Press. This book was released on 2022-04-15 with total page 192 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book tells the compelling and revealing story of the women’s movement in modern Wales. Its panoramic sweep takes the reader on a journey from the nineteenth-century campaigns in support of democracy and the right to vote, and in opposition to slavery, through to the construction of the labour movement in the twentieth century, and on to the more recent demands for sexual liberation and LGBTQ+ rights. At its core is the argument that the Welsh women’s movement was committed to social democracy, rather than to liberal or conservative alternatives, and that material conditions were the central motivation of those women involved. Drawing on an array of sources, some of which appear in print for the first time, this is a vivid portrait of women who, out of a struggle for equality, individually and collectively, became political activists, grassroots journalists, members of councils and parliaments, and inspirational community leaders.


Download Why Baby Boomers Turned from Religion PDF

Why Baby Boomers Turned from Religion

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780192866684
Pages : 244 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (192 users)

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Download or read book Why Baby Boomers Turned from Religion PDF or another Format written by Abby Day and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2022-09-15 with total page 244 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Mocked, vilified, blamed, and significantly misunderstood - the 'Baby Boomers' are members of the generation of post-WWII babies who came of age in the 1960s. Parents of the 1940s and 1950s raised their Boomer children to be respectable church-attendees, and yet in some ways demonstrated an ambivalence that permitted their children to spurn religion and eventually to raise their own children to be the least religious generation ever. The Baby Boomers studied here, living in the UK and Canada, were the last generation to have been routinely baptised and taken regularly to mainstream, Anglican churches. So, what went wrong - or, perhaps, right? This study, based on in-depth interviews and compared to other studies and data, is the first to offer a sociological account of the sudden transition from religious parents to non-religious children and grandchildren, focusing exclusively on this generation of ex-Anglican Boomers. Now in their 60s and 70s, the Boomers featured here make sense of their lives and the world they helped create. They discuss how they continue to dis-believe in God yet have an easy relationship with ghosts, and how they did not, as theologians often claim, fall into an immoral self-centred abyss. They forged different practices and sites (whether in 'this world' or 'elsewhere') of meaning, morality, community, and transcendence. They also reveal here the values, practices, and beliefs they transmitted to the future generations, helping shape the non-religious identities of Generation X, Millennials, and Generation Z.


Download The British Labour Party in Opposition and Power 1979-2019 PDF

The British Labour Party in Opposition and Power 1979-2019

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781317595373
Pages : 422 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (317 users)

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Download or read book The British Labour Party in Opposition and Power 1979-2019 PDF or another Format written by Patrick Diamond and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2021-01-18 with total page 422 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book provides a novel account of the Labour Party’s years in opposition and power since 1979, examining how New Labour fought to reinvent post-war social democracy, reshaping its core political ideas. It charts Labour’s sporadic recovery from political disaster in the 1980s, successfully making the arduous journey from opposition to power with the rise (and ultimately fall) of the governments of Tony Blair and Gordon Brown. Forty years on from the 1979 debacle, Labour has found itself on the edge of oblivion once again. Defeated in 2010, it entered a further cycle of degeneration and decline. Like social democratic parties across Europe, Labour failed to identify a fresh ideological rationale in the aftermath of the great financial crisis. Drawing on a wealth of sources including interviews and unpublished papers, the book focuses on decisive points of transformational change in the party’s development raising a perennial concern of present-day debate – namely whether Labour is a party capable of transforming the ideological weather, shaping a new paradigm in British politics, or whether it is a party that should be content to govern within parameters established by its Conservative opponents. This text will be of interest to the general reader as well as scholars and students of British politics, British political party history, and the history of the British Labour Party since 1918.