Download Cult Places and Cultural Change in Republican Italy PDF

Cult Places and Cultural Change in Republican Italy

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Publisher : Amsterdam University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9789089641779
Pages : 263 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (89 users)

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Download or read book Cult Places and Cultural Change in Republican Italy PDF or another Format written by Tesse Dieder Stek and published by Amsterdam University Press. This book was released on 2009 with total page 263 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Summary: This study throws new light on the Roman impact on Italic religious structures in the last four centuries BC and, more generally, on the complex processes of change and accommodation set in motion by the Roman expansion in Italy. Cult places had a pivotal function among the various 'Italic' tribes known to us from the ancient sources, which had been gradually conquered and subsequently controlled by Rome. Through an analysis of archaeological, literary and epigraphic evidence from rural cult places in Central and Southern Italy including a case study on the Samnite temple of San Giovanni in Galdo, the authors investigate the fluctuating function of cult places in among the non-Roman Italic communities, before and after the establishment of Roman rule.


Download Processes of Cultural Change and Integration in the Roman World PDF

Processes of Cultural Change and Integration in the Roman World

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Publisher : BRILL
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ISBN 10 : 9789004294554
Pages : 324 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (4 users)

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Download or read book Processes of Cultural Change and Integration in the Roman World PDF or another Format written by and published by BRILL. This book was released on 2015-06-29 with total page 324 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Processes of Cultural Change and Integration in the Roman World is a collection of studies on the mechanisms by which interaction occurred between Rome and the peoples that became part of its Empire between c. 300 BC and AD 300.


Download Cosa and the Colonial Landscape of Republican Italy (Third and Second Centuries BCE) PDF

Cosa and the Colonial Landscape of Republican Italy (Third and Second Centuries BCE)

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ISBN 10 : 9780472131549
Pages : 311 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (472 users)

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Download or read book Cosa and the Colonial Landscape of Republican Italy (Third and Second Centuries BCE) PDF or another Format written by Andrea De Giorgi and published by . This book was released on 2019 with total page 311 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Probes evidence of the rising hegemony that became Rome


Download Urban Transformation in Ancient Molise PDF

Urban Transformation in Ancient Molise

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780190641436
Pages : 369 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (19 users)

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Download or read book Urban Transformation in Ancient Molise PDF or another Format written by Elizabeth C. Robinson and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2021 with total page 369 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "This book uses all the available evidence to create a site biography of Larinum from 400 BCE to 100 CE, with a focus on the urban transformation that occurs there during the Roman conquest. Larinum, a pre-Roman town in the modern region of Molise, undergoes a unique transition from independence to municipal status when it receives Roman citizenship in the 80s BCE shortly after the Social War. Its trajectory illuminates complex processes of cultural, social and political change associated with the Roman conquest throughout the Italian peninsula in the first millennium BCE. This work highlights the importance of local isolated variability in studies of the Roman conquest, and provides a narrative that supplements larger works on this theme. Through a focus on local-level agency, it demonstrates strong local continuity in Larinum and its surrounding territory. This continuity is the key to Larinum's transition into the Roman state, which is spearheaded by the local elites. They participate in the broader cultural choices of the Hellenistic koiné and strive to be part of a Mediterranean-wide dialog that, over time, will come to be dominated by Rome. The case is made for advancing the field of Roman conquest studies under a new paradigm of social transformation that focuses on a history of gradual change, continuity, connectivity and local isolated variability that is contingent on highly specific issues rather than global movements"--


Download The Peoples of Ancient Italy PDF

The Peoples of Ancient Italy

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Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
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ISBN 10 : 9781501500145
Pages : 786 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (51 users)

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Download or read book The Peoples of Ancient Italy PDF or another Format written by Gary D. Farney and published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. This book was released on 2017-11-20 with total page 786 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Although there are many studies of certain individual ancient Italic groups (e.g. the Etruscans, Gauls and Latins), there is no work that takes a comprehensive view of each of them—the famous and the less well-known—that existed in Iron Age and Roman Italy. Moreover, many previous studies have focused only on the material evidence for these groups or on what the literary sources have to say about them. This handbook is conceived of as a resource for archaeologists, historians, philologists and other scholars interested in finding out more about Italic groups from the earliest period they are detectable (early Iron Age, in most instances), down to the time when they begin to assimilate into the Roman state (in the late Republican or early Imperial period). As such, it will endeavor to include both archaeological and historical perspectives on each group, with contributions from the best-known or up-and-coming archaeologists and historians for these peoples and topics. The language of the volume is English, but scholars from around the world have contributed to it. This volume covers the ancient peoples of Italy more comprehensively in individual chapters, and it is also distinct because it has a thematic section.


Download The Archaeology of Lucanian Cult Places PDF

The Archaeology of Lucanian Cult Places

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781317103110
Pages : 322 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (317 users)

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Download or read book The Archaeology of Lucanian Cult Places PDF or another Format written by Ilaria Battiloro and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2017-08-10 with total page 322 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: With the emergence and structuring of the Lucanian ethnos during the fourth century BC, a network of cult places, set apart from habitation spaces, was created at the crossroads of the most important communication routes of ancient Lucania. These sanctuaries became centers of social and political aggregation of the local communities: a space in which the community united for all the social manifestations that, in urban societies, were usually performed within the city space. With a detailed analysis of the archaeological record, this study traces the historical and archaeological narrative of Lucanian cult places from their creation to the Late Republican Age, which saw the incorporation of southern Italy into the Roman state. By placing the sanctuaries within their territorial, political, social, and cultural context, Battiloro offers insight into the diachronic development of sacred architecture and ritual customs in ancient Lucania. The author highlights the role of material evidence in constructing the significance of sanctuaries in the historical context in which they were used, and crucial new evidence from the most recent archaeological investigations is explored in order to define dynamics of contact and interaction between Lucanians and Romans on the eve of the Roman conquest.


Download Burial and Social Change in First Millennium BC Italy PDF

Burial and Social Change in First Millennium BC Italy

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Publisher : Oxbow Books Limited
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ISBN 10 : 9781785701870
Pages : 336 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (785 users)

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Download or read book Burial and Social Change in First Millennium BC Italy PDF or another Format written by Elisa Perego and published by Oxbow Books Limited. This book was released on 2016-11-30 with total page 336 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In the first millennium BC, communities in Italy underwent crucial transformations which scholars have often subsumed under the heading of ‘state formation’, namely increased social stratification, the centralization of political power and, in some cases, urbanisation. Most research has tended to approach the phenomenon of state formation and social change in relation to specific territorial dynamics of growth and expansion, changing modes of exploitation of food and other resources over time, and the adoption of selected socio-ritual practices by the ruling élites in order to construct and negotiate authority. In contrast, comparatively little attention has been paid to the question of how these key developments resonated across the broader social transect, and how social groups other than ruling élites both promoted these changes and experienced their effects. The chief aim of this collection of 14 papers is to harness innovative approaches to the exceptionally rich mortuary evidence of first millennium BC Italy, in order to investigate the roles and identities of social actors who either struggled for power and social recognition, or were manipulated and exploited by superior authorities in a phase of tumultuous socio-political change throughout the entire Mediterranean basin. Contributors provide a diverse range of approaches in order to examine how power operated in society, how it was exercised and resisted, and how this can be studied through mortuary evidence. Section 1 addresses the construction of identity by focusing mainly on the manipulation of age, ethnic and gender categories in society in regions and sites that reached notable power and splendor in first millennium BC Italy. These include Etruria, Latium, Campania and the rich settlement of Verucchio, in Emilia Romagna. Each paper in Section 2 offers a counterpoint to a contribution in Section 1 with an overall emphasis on scholarly multivocality, and the multiplicity of the theoretical approaches that can be used to read the archaeological evidence.


Download Italy's Economic Revolution PDF

Italy's Economic Revolution

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Publisher : Oxford University Press, USA
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ISBN 10 : 9780198829447
Pages : 314 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (198 users)

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Download or read book Italy's Economic Revolution PDF or another Format written by Saskia T. Roselaar and published by Oxford University Press, USA. This book was released on 2019-09-19 with total page 314 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Roman conquest of Italy in the Republican period (from c. 400 to 50 BC) led to widespread economic changes in which the conquered Italians played an important role. Italy's Economic Revolution analyses the integration of Italy during this period and explores the interplay between economic activities and unification in its civic, legal, social, and cultural senses. On one hand, it investigates whether Italy became more integrated economically following the Roman conquest and traces the widely varying local reactions to the globalization of the Italian economy; on the other, it examines whether and how economic activities carried out by Italians contributed to the integration of the Italian peoples into the Roman framework. Throughout the Republican period, Italians were able to profit from the expansion of the Roman dominion in the Mediterranean and the new economic opportunities it afforded, which led to gradual changes in institutions, culture, and language: through overseas trade and commercial agriculture they had gained significant wealth, which they invested in the Italian landscape, and they were often ahead of Romans when it came to engagement with Hellenistic culture. However, their economic prosperity and cultural sophistication did not lead to civic equality, nor to equal opportunities to exploit the territories the Italians had conquered under Rome's lead. Eventually the Italians rose in rebellion against Rome in the Social War of 91-88 BC, after which they were finally granted Roman citizenship. This volume investigates not only whether and how economic interaction played a role in this civic integration, but also highlights the importance of Roman citizenship as an instrument of further economic, political, social, and cultural integration between Romans and Italians.


Download Migration, Mobility and Place in Ancient Italy PDF

Migration, Mobility and Place in Ancient Italy

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781108240543
Pages : pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (18 users)

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Download or read book Migration, Mobility and Place in Ancient Italy PDF or another Format written by Elena Isayev and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2017-08-31 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Migration, Mobility and Place in Ancient Italy challenges prevailing conceptions of a natural tie to the land and a demographically settled world. It argues that much human mobility in the last millennium BC was ongoing and cyclical. In particular, outside the military context 'the foreigner in our midst' was not regarded as a problem. Boundaries of status rather than of geopolitics were those difficult to cross. The book discusses the stories of individuals and migrant groups, traders, refugees, expulsions, the founding and demolition of sites, and the political processes that could both encourage and discourage the transfer of people from one place to another. In so doing it highlights moments of change in the concepts of mobility and the definitions of those on the move. By providing the long view from history, it exposes how fleeting are the conventions that take shape here and now.


Download The Archaeology of Imperial Landscapes PDF

The Archaeology of Imperial Landscapes

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781108103176
Pages : 388 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (18 users)

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Download or read book The Archaeology of Imperial Landscapes PDF or another Format written by Bleda S. Düring and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2018-03-29 with total page 388 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Archaeology of Imperial Landscapes examines the transformation of rural landscapes and societies that formed the backbone of ancient empires in the Near East and Mediterranean. Through a comparative approach to archaeological data, it analyses the patterns of transformation in widely differing imperial contexts in the ancient world. Bringing together a range of studies by an international team of scholars, the volume shows that empires were dynamic, diverse, and experimental polities, and that their success or failure was determined by a combination of forceful interventions, as well as the new possibilities for those dominated by empires to collaborate and profit from doing so. By highlighting the processes that occur in rural and peripheral landscapes, the volume demonstrates that the archaeology of these non-urban and literally eccentric spheres can provide an important contribution to our understanding of ancient empires. The 'bottom up' approach to the study of ancient empires is crucial to understanding how these remarkable socio-political organisms could exist and persist.


Download The Archaeology of Imperial Landscapes PDF

The Archaeology of Imperial Landscapes

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781107189706
Pages : 385 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (17 users)

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Download or read book The Archaeology of Imperial Landscapes PDF or another Format written by Bleda S. Düring and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2018-03-29 with total page 385 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book examines the poorly understood transformations in rural landscapes and societies that formed the backbone of ancient empires.


Download A Companion to Roman Italy PDF

A Companion to Roman Italy

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Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
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ISBN 10 : 9781118993118
Pages : 576 pages
Rating : 4.9/5 (118 users)

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Download or read book A Companion to Roman Italy PDF or another Format written by Alison E. Cooley and published by John Wiley & Sons. This book was released on 2016-01-05 with total page 576 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A Companion to Roman Italy investigates the impactof Rome in all its forms—political, cultural, social, andeconomic—upon Italy’s various regions, as well as theextent to which unification occurred as Rome became the capital ofItaly. The collection presents new archaeological data relating to thesites of Roman Italy Contributions discuss new theories of how to understandcultural change in the Italian peninsula Combines detailed case-studies of particular sites withwider-ranging thematic chapters Leading contributors not only make accessible the most recentwork on Roman Italy, but also offer fresh insight on long standingdebates


Download A Companion to the Archaeology of the Roman Republic PDF

A Companion to the Archaeology of the Roman Republic

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Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
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ISBN 10 : 9781118557167
Pages : 752 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (118 users)

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Download or read book A Companion to the Archaeology of the Roman Republic PDF or another Format written by Jane DeRose Evans and published by John Wiley & Sons. This book was released on 2013-03-29 with total page 752 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A Companion to the Archaeology of the Roman Republicoffers a diversity of perspectives to explore how differingapproaches and methodologies can contribute to a greaterunderstanding of the formation of the Roman Republic. Brings together the experiences and ideas of archaeologistsfrom around the world, with multiple backgrounds and areas ofinterest Offers a vibrant exploration of the ways in whicharchaeological methods can be used to explore different elements ofthe Roman Republican period Demonstrates that the Republic was not formed in a vacuum, butwas influenced by non-Latin-speaking cultures from throughout theMediterranean region Enables archaeological thinking in this area to be madeaccessible both to a more general audience and as a valuableaddition to existing discourse Investigates the archaeology of the Roman Republican periodwith reference to material culture, landscape, technology, identityand empire


Download The Origins of Concrete Construction in Roman Architecture PDF

The Origins of Concrete Construction in Roman Architecture

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781108997478
Pages : pages
Rating : 4.9/5 (18 users)

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Download or read book The Origins of Concrete Construction in Roman Architecture PDF or another Format written by Marcello Mogetta and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2021-06-24 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In this study, Marcello Mogetta examines the origins and early dissemination of concrete technology in Roman Republican architecture. Framing the genesis of innovative building processes and techniques within the context of Rome's early expansion, he traces technological change in monumental construction in long-established urban centers and new Roman colonial cites founded in the 2nd century BCE in central Italy. Mogetta weaves together excavation data from both public monuments and private domestic architecture that have been previously studied in isolation. Highlighting the organization of the building industry, he also explores the political motivations and cultural aspirations of patrons of monumental architecture, reconstructing how they negotiated economic and logistical constraints by drawing from both local traditions and long-distance networks. By incorporating the available evidence into the development of concrete technology, Mogetta also demonstrates the contributions of anonymous builders and contractors, shining a light on their ability to exploit locally available resources.


Download Romans and Barbarians Beyond the Frontiers PDF

Romans and Barbarians Beyond the Frontiers

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Publisher : Oxbow Books
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ISBN 10 : 9781785706059
Pages : 176 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (785 users)

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Download or read book Romans and Barbarians Beyond the Frontiers PDF or another Format written by Sergio Gonzalez Sanchez and published by Oxbow Books. This book was released on 2017-03-31 with total page 176 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This first thematic volume of the new series TRAC Themes in Roman Archaeology brings renowned international experts to discuss different aspects of interactions between Romans and ‘barbarians’ in the north-western regions of Europe. Northern Europe has become an interesting arena of academic debate around the topics of Roman imperialism and Roman:‘barbarian’ interactions, as these areas comprised Roman provincial territories, the northern frontier system of the Roman Empire (limes), the vorlimes (or buffer zone), and the distant barbaricum. This area is, today, host to several modern European nations with very different historical and academic discourses on their Roman past, a factor in the recent tendency towards the fragmentation of approaches and the application of post-colonial theories that have favoured the advent of a varied range of theoretical alternatives. Case studies presented here span across disciplines and territories, from American anthropological studies on transcultural discourse and provincial organization in Gaul, to historical approaches to the propagandistic use of the limes in the early 20th century German empire; from Danish research on warrior identities and Roman-Scandinavian relations, to innovative ideas on culture contact in Roman Ireland; and from new views on Romano-Germanic relations in Central European Barbaricum, to a British comparative exercise on frontier cultures. The volume is framed by a brilliant theoretical introduction by Prof. Richard Hingley and a comprehensive concluding discussion by Prof. David Mattingly.


Download Beyond the Romans PDF

Beyond the Romans

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Publisher : Oxbow Books
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ISBN 10 : 9781789251371
Pages : 176 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (789 users)

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Download or read book Beyond the Romans PDF or another Format written by Irene Selsvold and published by Oxbow Books. This book was released on 2020-04-09 with total page 176 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This latest volume in the TRAC Themes in Theoretical Roman Archaeology series takes up posthuman theoretical perspectives to interpret Roman material culture. These perspectives provide novel and compelling ways of grappling with theoretical problems in Roman archaeology producing new knowledge and questions about the complex relationships and interactions between humans and non-humans in Roman culture and society. Posthumanism constitutes a multitude of theoretical positions characterised by common critiques of anthropocentrism and human exceptionalism. In part, they react to the dominance of the linguistic turn in humanistic sciences. These positions do not exclude “the human”, but instead stress the mutual relationship between matter and discourse. Moreover, they consider the agency of “non-humans”, e.g., animals, material culture, landscapes, climate, and ideas, their entanglement with humans, and the situated nature of research. Posthumanism has had substantial impacts in several fields (including critical studies, archaeology, feminist studies, even politics) but have not yet emerged in any fulsome way in Classical Studies and Classical Archaeology. This is the first volume on these themes in Roman Archaeology, aimed at providing valuable perspectives into Roman myth, art and material culture, displacing and complicating notions of human exceptionalism and individualist subjectivity. Contributions consider non-human agencies, particularly animal, material, environmental, and divine agencies, critiques of binary oppositions and gender roles, and the Anthropocene. Ultimately, the papers stress that humans and non-humans are entangled and imbricated in larger systems: we are all post-human.


Download Roman Colonies in Republic and Empire PDF

Roman Colonies in Republic and Empire

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Publisher : BRILL
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ISBN 10 : 9789004438347
Pages : 125 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (4 users)

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Download or read book Roman Colonies in Republic and Empire PDF or another Format written by Amanda Jo Coles and published by BRILL. This book was released on 2020-06-22 with total page 125 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Roman Republican and Imperial colonies were established by diverse agents reacting to contemporary problems. By removing anachronistic interpretations, Roman colonies cease to seem like ‘little Romes’ and demonstrate a complex role in the spread of Roman imperialism and culture.